‘Swiss Hanok’ opens its doors to the public again with a new exhibition of photographs










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‘Swiss Hanok’ opens its doors to the public again with a new exhibition of photographs

Works by Korean and Swiss photographers are displayed throughout the Swiss Embassy in central Seoul for an exhibition titled
Works by Korean and Swiss photographers are on display throughout the Swiss Embassy in central Seoul for an exhibition titled “Spaceless” until Nov. 6. Courtesy of the Swiss Embassy


By Kwon Mee-yoo

The Swiss Embassy in Seoul, also known as “Swiss Hanok”, is one of the architectural gems among foreign missions in Seoul, combining elements of traditional Korean and modern Western architecture.

Following the success of “Breathing Walls,” an exhibit that drew some 7,000 visitors last year, the embassy grounds are open to the public for its second photo exhibit, “Spaceless,” through Nov. 6.

Swiss Ambassador to Korea Dagmar Schmidt Tartagli said she was delighted to once again open the embassy to the public to showcase the works of up-and-coming Korean and Swiss artists.

“The premises of the Swiss Embassy have transformed into a beautiful exhibition space showcasing original works by artists from both countries who offer different perspectives on urban and digital transformations,” the Ambassador said.

Chun Kyung-woo, an art professor at Chung-Ang University, curated the works of eight photographers―four Koreans and four Swiss―for this exhibition.

Chun, who curated last year’s photo exhibition, brought in former artists from the photography department of Seoul’s Chung-Ang University and Lausanne University of Art and Design (ECAL) in Switzerland, bringing diverse perspectives on urban planning and architecture.

The works on display showcase the photographers’ artistic experiences ranging from drone photography to objects created using 3D printing.

Works by Korean and Swiss photographers are displayed outside the Swiss Embassy in central Seoul for
Works by Korean and Swiss photographers are on display in front of the Swiss Embassy in central Seoul for “Spaceless,” a photography exhibition, through Nov. 6. Courtesy of the Swiss Embassy


Florian Amoser used drones to explore new perspectives, taking photos of the air shafts of underground tunnels. He also devised a unique way of presenting the photos, using a roller to attempt to incorporate a 360 degree image onto a flat surface.

Alexandra Dautel captured a community in Israel, also known as a kibbutz, blurring the line between utopia and dystopia through her unique architecture.

For “Semi basement, Goshiwon, and Flood,” Korean artist Jeong Young-ho collected keywords from online discourse about recent flooding in Korea and created a structure based on how often the words are first mentioned in a digital space, then using a 3D printer. . He photographed the actual 3D printed object, which captures the invisible phenomenon.

Other photographers participating in the exhibition include Jung Ji-hyun, Kim Do-young, Margot Sparkes, Younes Klouche and Yun Tae-jun.

Chun explained that the works on display resonate with the Swiss Embassy, ​​which is in the city but separate from the city, as the artists shed new light on the spaces.

“Visitors will have a unique experience as the exhibition will take place both inside and outside the Embassy premises, providing a three-dimensional spatial experience,” Chun said.

The exhibition is free, but visitors must make an online reservation in advance.


























































































































Tracey L. Sweeney