A photography exhibition shows the importance of trees

A view of Habibul Haque’s solo photography exhibition titled Trunk Call underway at Drik Gallery, DrikPath Bhobon, Panthapath in the capital. — New Age Photo

Habibul Haque’s solo photography exhibition titled Trunk Call ongoing at Drik Gallery, DrikPath Bhobon, Panthapath in the capital aims to raise awareness of the importance of trees for a livable and sustainable environment.

The exhibition, organized on the occasion of World Environment Day 2022, features 34 photographs of cut trees and tree trunks.

Anu Muhammad, professor at the University of Jahangirnagar, Yan Yan, the queen of the Chakma circle, Sanjeeb Drong, human rights activist, and Shahidul Alam, founder of Drik, were, among others, present at the inaugural ceremony of the exhibition held on June 5.

Bithi Ghosh performed songs while Amal Akash staged performance art for the audience to enjoy.

Habibul Haque said, “Back then, we used to book phone calls to talk to someone living in a distant country. The trees are gradually disappearing due to urbanization. It seems like the trees are trying to make trunk calls to reach us,” said Habibul Haque, adding, “Most of my photographs show cut tree trunks.

His photograph titled Call for Emancipation was taken at Suhrawardi Udyan in the capital. It shows a tree trunk resembling a person raising their hand.

The photograph titled Battered Form shows the remains of a large tree that has been felled. The tree has been cut into large and small pieces which are scattered on a green field.

A series of photos entitled Enigma, consisting of six photographs, was presented in the exhibition. The series captures different patterns that appear naturally on tree trunks.

“Humans have different qualities that resemble trees. The silence of a tree, the calm appearance and many other things can also be observed in humans. I want the audience to relate to these characteristics,” Habibul said.

The photographs of trees featured in the exhibit were taken in different locations in Bangladesh, including Dhaka, Chattogram, Patuakhali, Kuakata, and Habiganj, among others.

The photograph titled Stranger in a Strange Land was taken at Char Gangamati in Patuakhali. It shows an isolated tree trunk, covered in algae, abandoned in the middle of a vast sand-covered plane.

Another photograph titled Eternal Life was captured in Chattogram. It shows shoots sprouting from cut tree trunks that have been stacked.

“I love nature and trees. Therefore, I wanted to capture their sadness through my lens. This exhibition will be a success if the public realizes the importance of trees for a livable and sustainable environment,” concluded Habibul.

The exhibition will end on June 14.

Tracey L. Sweeney